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First 25 Dogger Bank Wind Farm scholarships awarded to university students

3rd February 2022 in Community News, Press releases, Project news

  • 25 Scholarships awarded to students from the north-east of England and East Riding of Yorkshire to help young people prepare for working life in a Net Zero world.
  • The students are undertaking courses focussed on science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects.
  • The scholarships are part of a wider £1 million investment in local communities during the construction of the wind farm.

February 2022: Twenty five students from coastal communities in the north and north-east of England are being supported to fulfil their potential thanks to a scholarship of £5,000 each from Dogger Bank Wind Farm.

The Scholarship Fund provides grants to local students undertaking science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) courses in further education. The grants provided this month are the first round of the Scholarship Fund with a total of 62 scholarships being awarded during the construction of the wind farm.

The students are undertaking a wide range of STEM courses from diverse subjects such as flood management and cyber security. The role of the NHS during the pandemic has clearly inspired young people with six scholars undertaking medical related degrees. There is also clearly a focus on the climate emergency with five students undertaking degrees which can help prepare for a Net Zero future.

Ethan Young (21), is from Redcar and is studying Mechanical Engineering at Teesside University. The former Middlesbrough College Apprentice, said:

“Teesside is rich in engineering history, and it is something I have always been interested in. You can change the future by the way you design and develop new technologies. I think the financial support provided by the wind farm is really immense as it allows you to fully focus your time on your studies rather than have the burden of financial worries associated with university.”

Ruby Franklin (19), from Swanland in East Riding of Yorkshire is studying Engineering at the University of Sheffield. Ruby, a former South Hunsley School and Sixth Form College student, said:

“This scholarship has helped me with financial concerns so that I can focus fully on my studies whilst also inspiring me about renewable energy in my local area.”

Joshua Moore (19), from South Shields is studying Chemical Engineering at the University of Manchester. Joshua previously studied at Harton Sixth Form College. He said:

This scholarship has helped me with my studies as it helps give me some peace of mind when it comes to repaying my student loans, allowing me to focus wholly on my studies.”

Dogger Bank Wind Farm will be located more than 130 km off the Yorkshire coast and will generate enough renewable energy to power six million UK homes. A joint venture between SSE Renewables, Equinor and Eni, SSE Renewables is leading on Dogger Bank construction and delivery while Equinor will operate the wind farm on completion.

In June Dogger Bank Wind Farm unveiled plans for a £1 million construction fund to support the coastal communities where its onshore infrastructure is being developed. The programme includes a significant investment in science, technology, engineering and maths, as well as an operators fund to support local causes. Further information is available here. 

Lindsay Dougan, Community Investment Manager for Dogger Bank Wind Farm, said:

“The quality of scholarship applications from students were very high and shows the excellent subjects being studied by local people. We are proud to help 25 young people  take steps into further education and to support the workforce of the future as we continue our work to build the world’s largest offshore wind farm.”

Picture caption: Redcar and Cleveland students Lucy Tunn (left), Ethan Young (centre) and Grace Robson (right) have all received scholarships from Dogger Bank Wind Farm.

Dogger Bank Wind Farm supports more local community projects

8th December 2021 in Community News, Press releases, Project news

Dogger Bank Wind Farm has demonstrated its commitment to the north and north-east of England with further awards from its operator fund. In the latest round of awards 15 local community groups have been supported to help local people recover and rebuild from the pandemic and to enhance local community assets.

The Dogger Bank Operator Fund provides small grants to grass roots community projects to help enhance quality of life for local residents, contribute to vibrant, healthy, successful and sustainable communities, and/or promote community spirit and encourage community activity.

The funding decisions are made by a panel with representatives from wind farm joint venture partners Equinor and SSE Renewables as well as independent participant Caroline Lofthouse from NOF. NOF is a not-for-profit business development organisation helping to make connections between national businesses and the energy sector.

Caroline Lofthouse, Head of Commercials & Partnerships at NOF and Cluster Manager for Energi Coast, north-east England’s offshore wind cluster, said: 

“The benefits of a vibrant offshore wind industry are far reaching and the Dogger Bank Constructor Fund demonstrates how the sector makes a significant contribution to the local community as well as the economy and our renewable energy requirements.  I am very proud to be part of this initiative, which is helping some important causes and organisations in the north of England.”

In East Riding of Yorkshire, Cherry Tree Community Centre has been supported to create new recipe bags for local residents. The bags provide healthy and nutritious meal ideas which can feed the whole family. Also in the region Men in Sheds Beverley has been provided support to enhance their facilities. This will enable more local older people to meet up, learn new skills and complete craftwork for the community. The Men in Sheds initiative is used by lots of local people, especially those who experience isolation or who are recovering from health complications including cancer and strokes.

Jo Ramsay, Manager at Cherry Tree Community Centre, said:

“We are extremely grateful for the support from Dogger Wind Farm. The community pantry was set up in Covid as lots of people lost an income, jobs and family members. We currently help support 800 adults and 500 children with food and emergency supplies from gas, electric and hygiene products. The recipe bags are a big success. Feedback from families and individuals is that it’s nice to follow a recipe and cook a healthy meal instead of convenience foods”

In South Tyneside, Wilby Roc has been funded to deliver a community well-being day. The charity recognises that many local people have had a challenging year and will deliver a well-being day which will allow community members to try new activities and crafts and learn well-being techniques. Also in the region, Bede’s Helping Hands has been supported to set up a job search club in their premises. The facility will enable local people to develop CVs, search for jobs and complete on-line training.

Danielle Pollard, Education Director at Wilby Rocs, said:

‘”The grant from the Dogger Bank Wind Farm will go towards essential well-being services. The people of South Tyneside have been through so much and we want to create a day where we can get people together and find out how to improve well-being, physical and mental health.  I give a huge thanks to Dogger Bank Wind Farm from Wilby Roc’s and the people of South Tyneside.”

Dogger Bank Wind Farm will be located more than 130 km off the Yorkshire coast and will generate enough renewable energy to power six million UK homes. A joint venture between SSE Renewables, Equinor and Eni, SSE Renewables is leading on Dogger Bank construction and delivery while Equinor will operate the wind farm on completion.

In June Dogger Bank Wind Farm unveiled plans for a £1 million construction fund to support the coastal communities where its onshore infrastructure is being developed. The programme includes a significant investment in science, technology, engineering and maths provision, university scholarships as well as an operators fund to support local causes. Further information is available at www.doggerbank.com/about/community/

The groups to receive awards in the latest round and how they used their grants:

East Riding:

  • Cherry Trees Community Centre – to provide recipe bags for local families
  • Long Riston Playing Fields – to re-develop a children’s play park
  • Rickaby Village Hall Committee – new kitchen equipment
  • Men in Sheds Beverley – safety enhancements
  • Beverley FM – community work experience placements
  • Kilham School PTA – outside STEM learning area
  • Nature Tots – equipment to support outdoor play group
  • Wombles Beverley – litter picking equipment
  • Woodmansey School PTA – sports equipment

South Tyneside: 

  • Bede’s Helping Hands Food Bank – setting up job search club
  • Bliss Ability – running community support group for people with depression
  • Hedworthfield Community Association – outdoor seating
  • Williby Rocs CIC – community wellbeing day
  • Action Station – volunteer expenses
  • Kayaks – support for a club for children with specialist needs

Dogger Bank Wind Farm and UK sub-supplier support school health event

22nd September 2021 in Community News, Press releases, Project news, Uncategorised

  • Youngsters learn about importance of health and safety in offshore wind sector.
  • Nottinghamshire-based firm nmcn shines a light on the construction industry.
  • nmcn to donate career storybook to every Primary School in East Riding.

Representatives from the team building the world’s largest offshore wind farm took part in a health promotion event to inspire young people at an East Riding primary school.

The week-long series of health-focused events was organised by Woodmansey CE Primary School, with the Dogger Bank team invited along to address the health and safety-related aspects of the offshore wind industry.

A representative from nmcn, a construction firm working on behalf of Dogger Bank’s tier one supplier Hitachi ABB Power Grids, shared exerts from the company’s “When I grow up” career story book. nmcn, which is supporting the construction of the wind farm’s first onshore convertor station, near Beverley, is donating a copy of the award-winning book to every primary school in East Riding. More information about the book is available at https://nmcn.com/news/when-i-grow-up-nmcn-childrens-book/

Woodmansey CE Primary School Head of School, Bethan Nicholls, said:

“When we first heard about the role Woodmansey was playing in the installation of the largest offshore wind farm, we knew we had to share this journey with the children. Our annual Health Week provided the perfect platform for Rachel and Chris to come and share the benefits of wind farms and how the children’s very own village was being used.

“STEM is such a vital area of the curriculum and events such as this provide the children with real experience of the industry, hopefully inspiring some of our children to seek future careers within the science, technology, engineering or maths sectors. We are very grateful to Rachel and Chris for their engagement with us.”

Community Engagement Manager for Dogger Bank Wind Farm, Rachel Lawrence, said:

“The onshore cable route for the wind farm runs directly underneath the village of Woodmansey, and local children would have seen critical work going on near their school very recently. So it’s been great to have the opportunity to come in and talk to the children about how those cables will eventually transmit renewable energy to millions of UK homes, as well as sharing important health and safety messages from across the green energy sector.

“The children enjoyed trying on some protective clothing and asked some impressive questions about the energy transition.

“It was also great to have the support of nmcn to share their impressive career storybook, which they’re offering to all 124 primary schools in East Riding.”  

In June Dogger Bank Wind Farm unveiled plans to invest £1 million in coastal communities during its construction. The programme will put science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM), at the heart of children’s education, helping them prepare for jobs that will be vital to the green economic recovery of the UK. Local community organisations can also apply for grants up to £500 at https://doggerbank.com/about/community/

The East Riding part of the programme was developed in partnership with East Riding of Yorkshire Council, providing opportunities for all 124 primary schools in the county to  increase and expand their STEM provision. The programme will also be rolled out on Teesside where the wind farm’s third phase connects to the National Grid, as well as South Tyneside where the operation and maintenance base will be located.

nmcn Business Development Manager, Chris Withers, said:

“The Dogger Bank Wind Farm is a major development which will deliver a number of benefits for both the public and supply chain. Through nmcn’s involvement in the project on behalf of Hitachi ABB Power Grids providing the civil engineering scope, we are also delighted to be able to visit Woodmansey Primary School to provide an insight into the construction industry, deliver health and safety advice and inspire future generations.”

Dogger Bank Wind Farm, which is to be built more than 130km off the Yorkshire coast in the North Sea, is currently being developed in three 1.2GW phases: Dogger Bank A, B and C.

Dogger Bank A and B is a joint venture between SSE Renewables (40 per cent), Equinor (40 per cent) and Eni (20 per cent), and will connect the National Grid between Beverley and Cottingham. Dogger Bank C is a 50:50 joint venture between SSE Renewables and Equinor and will connect the National Grid on Teesside.

Work on the onshore convertor station for Dogger Bank A began in the summer, at a site off the A1079 between Beverley and Cottingham. The convertor station will take the electricity generated by the wind turbines from the first phase of the wind farm in the North Sea, and convert it from HVDC to HVAC current, before the power passes through the adjacent main substation into the National Grid for distribution to homes and businesses.

nmcn is carrying out civil engineering work at the site on behalf of Hitachi ABB Power Grids. Hull-based Ashcourt Group previously carried out preparation work at the A1079 site on behalf of Hitachi ABB Power Grids.

Dogger Bank Wind Farm awarded contracts to Hitachi ABB Power Grids to install its HVDC Light® technology to connect the transmission link on all three phases of Dogger Bank Wind Farm, making it the UK’s first HVDC-connected windfarm.

Vessel transfer crew in Bridlington Harbour rescue

31st August 2021 in Community News, Press releases, Project news

A marine support crew working on Dogger Bank Wind Farm rescued a young boy at the weekend, when he got into difficulty in water at Bridlington Harbour.

The two-man crew from Scotland-based SMS was returning to the harbour on Sunday, when they heard a splash on the opposite side of the pontoon.

Celtic Mara Skipper Chris Warren and Deck Hand Neil MacInnes, spotted a young boy clinging to side of the pontoon in a state of panic. Neil pulled the boy to safety while Chris prevented a ladder from a nearby yacht falling onto the boy’s head.

The team offered the little boy, aged approximately 7 or 8, thermal protection and reassurance before leaving him in the care of his family.

“We were happy to have been in the right place at the right time to reach out and help this little boy. When we got to him he was shocked, cold and shivery, but thankfully didn’t appear to have swallowed any water,” explained Chris.

“We didn’t see how he got into difficulty and while the water there isn’t that deep, the ground is thick with mud and the temperature of the water is enough to send you into a panic.

“As we’re all trained in health and safety, first-aid and marine rescue, having commercial boats in a harbour to support a wind farm development can offer an extra degree of resilience, in addition to the critical work already carried out by the local RNLI and independent lifeboat crews.

“In our work we come across quite a lot of people near water who aren’t wearing lifejackets, and perhaps don’t fully appreciate the hidden dangers of falling into cold water.

“ As experienced mariners we would advise anyone who is spending time near water to follow the advice given by the RNLI at www.rnli.org

Dogger Bank Wind Farm, which is to be built more than 130km off the Yorkshire coast in the North Sea, is currently being developed in three 1.2GW phases: Dogger Bank A, B and C.

Dogger Bank A and B is a joint venture between SSE Renewables (40 per cent), Equinor (40 per cent) and Eni (20 per cent), and will connect the National Grid between Beverley and Cottingham. Dogger Bank C is a 50:50 joint venture between SSE Renewables and Equinor and will connect the National Grid on Teesside.

Chris and Neil are currently supporting Dogger Bank’s export cable provider, NKT and its sub-contractor ABCO, with crew transfers as they carry out inspection work on the nearshore cable route for A and B, adjacent to the landfall point at Ulrome.

Community Engagement Manager for Dogger Bank Wind Farm, Rachel Lawrence, said:

“The crew’s quick actions undoubtedly prevented what could have turned out to be a very different day for the little boy.

“The safety of people working on our development and the surrounding communities is paramount on Dogger Bank Wind Farm. The Celtic Mara team perfectly embody that safety culture, and deserve to be recognised for demonstrating how to work swiftly, calmly and efficiently in a crisis.

“We hope the little boy involved is feeling much better. ”

 

‘There’s never been a more important time to get this right.’

23rd August 2021 in Blogs, Community News, Project news

“With the risk of employment uncertainty in the post-pandemic world, and with many of our young people impacted by education and social challenges, we have an opportunity to use our net zero future as a springboard to turn this tide,” explains Lindsay Dougan, Community Investment Manager on Dogger Bank Wind Farm. 

“Dogger Bank Wind Farm is a key asset for the north and north-east of England. It will create and support thousands of jobs, as well as ensuring clean energy for future generations with the capacity to power 6 million UK homes. We take seriously our responsibility to develop the wind farm sustainably and part of this is our social commitment to share the benefit with coastal communities. We will invest £1 million during the construction of the wind farm and have committed to focusing on enhancing STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) attainment to ensure young people are prepared for the jobs of the future. 

“We made a commitment when we were developing the wind farm that we would invest in STEM as we have a responsibility to make sure young people are ready for the job opportunities on their doorstep. What we didn’t foresee was that we would be delivering this commitment during a pandemic!   

“Young people have had to experience social isolation and virtual learning in the last 18 months and we have an opportunity to use our net zero future to help them thrive during the pandemic recovery and beyond. 

“We have taken our commitment to local areas seriously – we have listened to education and skills partners and it is their expertise and local priorities which has determined what the STEM funding focuses on from early years in East Riding of Yorkshire to school transition in South Tyneside. This approach ensures it maximises its impact for the 25,000 young people in these local areas. 

“Our net zero future promises roles that will be challenging and rewarding in equal measure. From the turbine technicians who ensure the wind farms achieve optimum performance to the planning experts who will bring us even larger and more innovative wind farms in the future. The energy transition is one of society’s most pressing priorities and we have a responsibility to inspire and support the experts who will be the key to its success.  

“We know from our experience engaging with local schools how keen young people are to challenge themselves to live sustainable lives. In a recent visit to Skipsea Primary School in East Riding a colleague was asked by an 8-year-old boy whether she bought her electricity from renewable energy sources. The smart boy cleverly pointed out the electric vehicle she arrived in would only help the planet if she was buying her fuel from sustainable providers. We may be the trailblazers of offshore wind but it’s the eight-year-olds of today who will shape our tomorrow.  

“As we continue to build the world’s largest offshore wind farm at Dogger Bank, we have a one-in-a-lifetime opportunity to improve the lives of people living in the coastal communities where we’re installing our infrastructure. And there’s never been a more important time to get this right.”